Edward Hooker 1785-1846 draft

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630 Edward Hooker (Noadiah,5 Joseph,4 John,3 Samuel,2
Thomas1), son of Col. Noadiah and Rebekah (Griswold)
Hooker, of Farmington, Conn., b. April 27, 1785, at Farmington,
Conn. ; m. May 24, 1812, Elisabeth Daggett, daughter of
Henry, Esq., and Elisabeth (Prescott) Daggett, of New
Haven, Conn., b. July 5, 1786, at New Haven, Conn.
Mr. Hooker graduated from Yale College, 1805, went to Col
ombia, S. C, and studied law with his brother John, who was
established there a practising lawyer. While in South Carolina,
Mr. Hooker taught a school at Cambridge, S. C. (Old Ninety
Six), for a short time, then accepted a position as tutor in South
Carolina College, Columbia, S. C, continuing the study of law
with his brother. In 1808, he was appointed tutor in Yale College,
which appointment he accepted, and returned to Connecticut, to
enter upon the duty. He was made Clerk of the Faculty, and filled
Sixth Generation 141
the position during the time he was attached to the college. While
connected with Yale College, he made the acquaintance of Miss
Daggett, a niece of Hon. Roger Sherman (Signer of the Declara
tion of Independence), and preparatory to marrying her he re
signed his position at the college, returned to his native place,
Farmington, assumed the charge of his father’s farm and busi
ness, and the care of his father in his declining years, built a
home for his wife and settled down to farming and public duties.
After the death of his mother he brought his father to his own
house, and fitted up the old home for a collegiate school. His
school became quite noted, for a number of men who became noted
in public affairs were fitted for college in the “Old Red College,”
as the old house was called. This was the first movement in
educational matters at Farmington, and the old house in which
the first school was opened, had been the home of a descendant
from Ezekiel Cheever, the famous Colonial teacher, founder of
the Boston Latin School, and author of the first school books pub
lished in America.
After carrying on this private school for a few years, a move
ment was taken to form a company to found an Academy at
Farmington. Mr. Hooker became interested in the Academy
scheme, proposed to close his own school in favor of the Acad
emy, and wished to have Mr. Simeon Hart made the principal of
the Academy. This Academy, under Mr. Hart, became a famous
school. The Academy was finally relinquished, and Mr. Hart
opened a private school very much as Mr. Hooker had previously
done, and many famous men were fitted for college, and started
upon their public career in these schools of Mr. Simeon Hart and
his successor and nephew, Mr. Edward L. Hart.
“The Old Red College” having ended its service as the home
of a collegiate school, did duty for a time as a tenement, but it
was finally demolished to make room for the first school house of
Miss. Sarah Porter, and from this small building, upon the site
of the “Old Red College,” came the widely known Female School
of Miss Porter, and the Memorial Building, erected a few years
ago by Miss Porter’s scholars stands a little northward and west
ward from the site of the “Old Red College,” the home of a de
scendant from Ezekiel Cheever, and the place of the first great
education movement at Farmington, Conn.
After closing his school, Mr. Hooker settled down to literary
work, active participation in the public affairs of the town and
scientific farming. He died at Farmington, Conn., May 5, 1846.
She died at Hartford, Conn., Aug. 2, 1869.
CHILDREN, HOOKER.
*1625 Elisabeth Daggett, b. Farmington, Conn., May 1, 1813.
*1626 John b.